Snow peak 600 ml improvements

The Snow Peak mug is titanium, and the weight on the package is 2.5 oz with the included hot lips.

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It’s a little lower on paper than in real life. So since I don’t like those handles, let’s take them off. I should say I got this at the REI sale for like $20 after dividend and sale price.

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That’s better. Now the hot lips.

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Sweet. OK now a trick that I learned when I forgot a pot grabber one trip, use a silicone wristband around the lip. This serves as pot grabber and hot lips. And they weigh about the same amount.

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OK now for the coolest part. I love l light gear but light and cheap is the best! And while this isn’t lightest it was only $5.

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It’s the lid to a knock off Yankee candle they sell at Big Lots! A big reason I haven’t been buying titanium pots like this is that they are spendy, and they don’t always have lids but problem solved! And it fits over the silicone bracelet! I’m so excited my wife is laughing at me.

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Hahahahahahahahahahahaha 3.4 oz! I’m stoked! OK now for the fun part.
Building the coozy! For this you will need:

– Reflecting material like Reflectix or a windshield protector found at the Goodwill for a dollar.
– Duct tape or reflecting tape.
– Sissors.
– A tape measure.
– A pot.

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Start by measuring the pot.

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11.5 inches by 4 inches. OK now cut that out of your reflecting material.

Crap. We need a marker.

Revised materials list.
For this you will need:

– Reflecting material like Reflectix or a windshield protector found at the Goodwill for a dollar.
– Duct tape or reflecting tape.
– Scissors.
– A tape measure.
– A pot.
– A marker.

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You might want a helper. Then you cut out the shape.  Next trace the bottom of the pot on your material, and cut that out.

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OK cut out a few squares of tape, about six 1 inch squares. And use these to secure everything in place. Remember the reflective side goes towards the pot.

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You want some overlap to fold over the top.

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I totally did that on purpose.  I wanted to show that it’s easier to trim than to add. I swear.

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A little overhang is good, it helps the bottom sit well.

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Tape the bottom on, then tape the whole thing while it’s on the pot.

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Leave a little overhang again, this time to secure the bottom.

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I find it easiest to cut little slits in the tape overhang, then add tape to the bottom to toughen it up.

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New total! Let’s see the complete kit.

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4.92 for a alcohol set up is great!

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Not bad for the rocket either.

Worth $25.

DIY synthetic top quilt. What not to do.

Materials needed for a 6’3″ male:

4 yards of inner and outer fabric. I used Hexxon 1.0 .
4 feet of shock cord
One cord lock
4 yards Synthetic Insulation of your choice, I used 3.6 oz Climashield.

Let me start off by saying that I got this thing to work, even though it’s heavier Than I like.

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First you start out with your fabrics, and cut them to around 80″ if your 6’3″ like I am. I made a few mistakes putting this quilt together and this is where I made two of them. Just because you are 75 inches tall and you only want the quilt to come up to your chin does NOT mean to cut the fabric to 70″. That’s just dumb. There would be no room for a foot box. Second, if you want a head hole to wear the quilt like a poncho so you don’t have to bring a jacket, now is the time to cut it.

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Sew a hem on 3 sides of a 2.5 inch wide strip of cloth leaving one long edge with out a hem.

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Cut a hole about 12″ long where you want your head to come out. I put mine roughly in the center of the quilt. Now for the harder part, that I didn’t do and don’t have pictures to help explain.

Take the long UNHEMMED edge of the strip turn and sew it to the inside of the top layer of fabric.
Sew it so that when it’s right side out it doesn’t show the hem.

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Layer like so. You want the top fabric in the middle, the inner fabric on the bottom, and insulation on top.

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Pin the junk out of it. The more pins the better. Everything that I read to research this told me to sew it with the insulation faceting l facing up, but the insulation caught in the foot of the machine. So I turned it over and it seemed to work fine.

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Once your three sides are sewn up, you can turn it right side out to test the fit and trim off any excess. It’s better to be longer, it’s hard to add to these, believe me.

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OK this is from my screw up, but the idea will work. Imagine this is the underside of the quilt. You need to cut holes it the insulation and the inner layer of the fabric to match the hole already in the outer layer. Pull the strip of fabric through the head hole, the hemmed edge should be the edge that comes out. Then pin the inner layer and insulation to the outer, and sew it together.

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Place snaps like so along the head hole so it can close up. You want them to overlap a bit.

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OK bad pic, but assuming that everything else is working, sew the other cloth strip on, sandwiching the foot between the edges of the strip.

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OK worst picture ever. But if you look hard you can see the shock cord and cord lock passed though the fabric strip on the foot, and the snaps used to snap the foot box together. These snaps will also be used to seal the poncho around you.

Hopefully that’s not too hard to follow, I’m going to go back through when I sew the next quilt and use the better pics to update this post.

Golden Gate Canyon State Park trip report

Well we started out the trip by meeting over at Absher’s house, and doing an initial bag check. Then Chance, Absher and I decided an REI trip was a good idea. We went for some isobutene and ended up coming back with new shoes, a hat and various other trinkets and baubles. REI is dangerous. From there we decided to have some beers and we went to Odd 13 brewing for a couple of brews. Cool story is that all their main beers are named after childhood friends made into super heroes. From there we ended up at Miner’s Tavern , where we played shuffle board and drinking some more (I was DD, I only had 1 cider all night). We were waiting for Dan to show up, but like usual he went to the wrong place. So we had to leave and go meet him back at Absher’s. More drinks and a final bag check and packing occurred.

We woke up at 7 am and headed out after a hearty breakfast prepared by our personal chef (Absher). Then we promptly got lost due to Google dumping us in the middle of the road and stating that we were at our destination. So we arrived about an hour or so late, checked in, payed our dues and hit the trailhead.

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Well it was the wrong trailhead and we ended up hiking about ¼ mile down the road to the Horseshoe trailhead. Then west on the trial for around ½ mile and a left on the Black Bear trail, where Chance heard a mystery noise. Dan and I promptly convinced him a wolf was following us, then turned and barked loudly in his face midsentence. He jumped pretty well.

We pressed on to the peak, stopping every 15 feet to joke or recover from jokes, and generally made bad time due to too much fun.

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We stopped at what we thought was the actual peak, for an hour, and ate lunch. Absher and Chance had never used a rocket stove before so it was all new to them and Dan and I had some fun watching them struggle.

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We could not for the life of us discern the trial sometimes. We went off trail at least 5 times due to snow or confusing markers, and at one point there was 5 markers in a 10 foot area. All in a circle. With arrows pointing different directions.

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Coming down the other side towards Mule Deer Trail it started to snow/hail/rain. In that order. So we put our ponchos on, and were very happy that we had them.

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From there we went on to the Mule Deer Trial and had a nice walk until Chance started saying that there was a cougar behind us. We had been making cougar jokes all day, so imagine my surprise when I turn and see a white wolf running up the side of the mountain. We all stood in awe for a few minutes. It was awesome. Hands down the coolest wildlife sighting I’ve had to date. Sorry I didn’t get pics I was too surprised.

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Near where the sighting was, there were a few old cabins, and being much slower than the wolf I had ample time to get photos.

We hung a right on to the other most difficult trail, yes they have two most difficult trails, and started the hike up to the top of Coyote Trail.

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We walked on until we got to a good looking place to stop and then set up camp. We were on an incline, so it was good we all were in hammocks. One of my favorite things about hammocks is their flexibility on setting up nearly anywhere.

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The next day was nasty and beautiful. I woke to a fog on the next mountain over where we a fantastic and scary lightning show the night before, and before long it was on top of us.

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The Coyote trail before it got too steep. It was hard going, both the Black Bear and the Coyote Trails were around 2 miles long and each gained and lost around 1000 feet in that time. Coupled with rocky ascents and wet conditions, it was sure treacherous. I seriously hoped my new Merrell Chameleons had the grip to keep me shiny side up (review on these later).

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We made it to the top and had a view of about 12 feet.

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The way down was beautiful and creepy. Ever played Silent Hill? Yeah, like that. Everything was quiet, the visibility was low, and the weather was just cool enough to warrant some kind of head gear, I had on my awesome removable fleece hood it’s here. And was very warm. It’s surprisingly water resistant!

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We went on down, and eventually ran into another abandoned cabin in the fog. And I was surprised that I never even thought of serial killers.

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From there we continued down the trial in the fog and mist and didn’t really talk or joke, we were ready for some hot brunch. About 2 hours later we were in the warm confines of the Blue Parrot INSERT LINK in Lafayette CO. People look at a man in tights weird.