Some thoughts on my goals for this blog.

I was thinking and listing to NPR’s How I Made This podcast yesterday, and I realized something. I’m in this to be successful. Which should be obvious, after all, why do something if not to be successful at it. But on the top it wasn’t.

This blog started as a way to have fun and share knowledge. It still is! If I didn’t think this was fun I wouldn’t do it. But it has evolved into a thing I’m getting passionate about. I am probably not ever going to make a living off of this blog, but so far I have made friends, and a little money. (My most successful money making month resulted in $100 windfall. LINE THE KIDS UP HONEY! THEY’RE ALL GETTING GOLD TEETH!)  

I guess what I’m saying is if I want to be truly unique, to fill a niche of this Ultralight niche, I need to be unique enough to have my own space. So moving forward I will try to focus on more DIY and cottage manufacturer posts. I will also continue to be active on FB, and here of course.

Soto Amicus, my new favorite stove.

First off I am stoked about this stove, the Soto Amicus. I have been getting great boil times, and effect from this little guy, and it’s super windproof for a standalone canister stove.

But I’m sorry for not posting for a while but with the coming of the holidays and work, I am pretty busy this time of year. I’ll begin posting more after the new year. Until then I’ll just do a couple more.

OK back to the stove. The craftsmanship on this stove is amazing. I have a few things I like very much about the Amicus.

Soto Amicus

First is the spring hinge that the pot stands use. They are little barrels riveted to the underside of the burner. In the barrels is a spring that allows the stand arm to swing out and latch onto the hook that holds it up.

Soto Amicus
The stealth ignition on the Amicus works so reliability that I have moved my lighter into my food bag and out of my cook kit. I have NEVER had a piezio ignition that is this reliable.

Soto AmicusI attribute the reliability of the stealth ignition to the fact that the electrode is in the middle of the burner above, and to the thickness of the thing. The Amicus is the only stove I have seen that uses such a stout ignitor and it’s this thickness that makes it so able to handle the heat from the stove. All the other ignitors I have used are thin and warp, and when they warp they break the wire that causes the spark.

Soto Amicus

The third and probably most favorite thing is the concave burner. The lip around the burner is a small windscreen that makes this the most windproof solo stove I have ever used. I can blow it out but I need to be close and blow hard directly into the burner.

As for burn tests, I have gone through a 100-gram canister and recorded a couple of tests. The stove does pretty well, here are the numbers.

  • The Soto Amicus used an average of 6.8 grams of fuel per boil.
  • Average boil time was 3:45
  • I got 15 boils from the 100-gram canister of MSR four Season fuel.

The first test I did was at 34F, and it did pretty well, here is the video.

The second that I recorded was at 11F and I was very surprised at the performance.

My final thoughts