How to DIY a backpack part 2 – The Begining

In the last part I talked over planning the DIY Backpack in your head and the materials I used to make the pack. But I want you to know that materials are TOTALLY SUBJECTIVE AND SHOULD BE BASED ON THE PACKS INTENDED USE. You don’t want to make a pack out of 1.1 rip stop nylon and then take it on a bushwhacking adventure, similarly don’t make one out of cotton and then go on an extended backpacking trip in the Pacific Northwest.

The material you use warrants some thought. There are several good all-around fabrics, and a few specific ones, and I’ll be covering what my thought process is/was.

The first and most glaring choice is “Do I spring for DCF(Cuban Fiber) or not?” DCF in the weight and durability I wanted is available from ZPacks, and its about $15 per half yard. $30 isn’t much for a Cuban pack, but I’m not super confident dealing with it yet. And the robic was only $12.

The other option besides the Robic I finally went with is X-Pack, and while this would have been just as good in my opinion, it isn’t available through ripstopbytheroll.com. I didn’t want to make more than one order, and it was a little more expensive if I recall correctly.

The Robic was what I went with. Its a good price for the material, and it’s very durable. I think as far as a starter fabric it’s very forgiving, inexpensive and waterproof. Exactly what I wanted. Later I can play with DCF, but I want to get this pack down.

Making the templates. 

From here it’s time to make the plan. First, we need to know how big the pack going to be. I’m aiming at around 30 liters without accounting for the outside pockets. So to do that I found a bag that I like and I copied the dimensions.

The Gossamer Gear Kumo is the pack I modeled this one after. I like it because it’s a great platform for a UL to SUL pack. Anyway the Specs for the main body are:

  • 22″ tall
  • 11″ wide
  • 4.5″ deep

Add a half inch to each side for hems and we get:

  • 23″ Tall
  • 12″ wide
  • 5.5″ deep

This means that the front and back need to be around 23″ tall by 12″ wide if you are doing a drawstring, velcro, or button closure. If you are doing a roll top like me you will need to add somewhere around 5″ to the height of each of these. One important thing to remember is that this is for me, and if you are shorter or taller than me (I’m 6’3″) you should measure the distance from the top of your shoulder to the crest of your hip. This will tell you how long the pack body should be. Another option is to go to an REI and get yourself fitted. If you are shorter and want the same overall volume, just make the pack deeper. Take a look around for a pack that would fit you in the volume you want and use those dimensions. The overall themes here will still suffice to allow you to make the pack.

The bottom panel is easy, just a 12″ wide by 5.5″ rectangle.

I like to use cardboard for my templates, I feel it’s easier to hold in place than a cloth one, and I can find it easily. Others like paper bags, or even Tyvek.

DIY Backpack
The Template for the back/front panel I made.

This part is on you. Decide what you can get your hands on easiest and use that for the template. In the above picture I have laid out the plan on the panel. Since the Back and front are the same size I only made one template and then I planned out the pockets and straps using the folds of the cardboard, and a maker to label what went where. This is where you can see your pack start to take shape.

DIY Backpack

Next post is going to cover cutting out the templates, and then sewing basics for this and most outdoor projects.

Past Articles in this series:
Part One   Part Two

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